World of Warcraft: Socially Addicting?

World of Warcraft, without a doubt, is an incredibly popular game. However, it has garnered, like other, similar online games, a reputation for being distinctly addictive. For example, a Business Insider article titled “World Of Warcraft, as Addictive as Cocaine?”accounts how the Swedish Youth Foundation believe that World of Warcraft is extremely addicting, comparing it to cocaine. A 2006 study on WoW at UC Irvine makes an opposing claim, on the other hand: the game’s primary method of compelling their players to stay is the social aspect of this play. Indeed, according to a thesis by Constance Steinkuehler, these games can be both “cultural objects and culture,” allowing the players to develop very real cognitive and collaborative patterns in the game environment. This presents the games with a powerful potential to study how people learn and think, as they provide a representable trace in how people behave and collaborate in a positive environment for doing so. Thus, it’s likely that while World of Warcraft does get people playing, there’s a good chance that it isn’t just for the wrong reasons.

Works Cited:

Bonnie Nardi , Justin Harris, Strangers and friends: collaborative play in world of warcraft, Proceedings of the 2006 20th anniversary conference on Computer supported cooperative work, November 04-08, 2006, Banff, Alberta, Canada

Krangel, E. (2009, February 27). World Of Warcraft: As Addictive As Cocaine? Retrieved March 30, 2017, from http://www.businessinsider.com/world-of-warcraft-as-addictive-as-cocaine-2009-2

Steinkuehler, C. A. (2005). Cognition and learning in massively multiplayer online games: A critical approach (Order No. 3186279). Available from ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global. (305378553). Retrieved from http://du.idm.oclc.org/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/305378553?accountid=14608

 

WoW… So Addicting…Much Video Games

Some players spend so much time playing World of Warcraft that it starts to become and addition as well as affect their daily lives. Factors that affect players can include usage, amount of time played, and virtual/social interaction with other players (Peters 2008). The affect of addiction can be either psychologically positive or negative depending on the amount of social interaction that a player has with others. Players of WoW were found to derive social support from playing and a positive relationship was found between game engagement and levels of in-game social support. Higher levels of in-game social support were associated with fewer negative psychological symptoms, although this effect was not maintained after accounting for social support derived from the offline sources (Longman 2009). From this a conclusion can be made that WoW addiction is correlated with the amount of social support that one receives from other players. The higher that level, therefore the higher chance of addiction.

References:

Huon Longman, Dr. Erin O’Connor, and Patricia Obst. CyberPsychology & Behavior. October 2009, 12(5): 563-566. doi:10.1089/cpb.2009.0001.

Christopher S. Peters and L. Alvin Malesky, Jr.. CyberPsychology & Behavior. August 2008, 11(4): 481-484. doi:10.1089/cpb.2007.0140.

Sottek, T.C. “If ‘World of Warcraft’ Is a Drug, Blizzard Is a Cruel Drug Dealer.” The Verge. The Verge, 26 Sept. 2014. Web. 29 Mar. 2017.

Addiction of WOW

  1. In the article “The Worst Examples of World of Warcraft Addiction” written by Kevin Wong(2014), the author refer some horrible examples of people who are addicted to World of Warcraft.

 

  1. Oggins and Sammis refer that World of Warcraft is addictive in their article “Notions of video game addiction and their relation to self-reported addiction among players of world of Warcraft”(2012). Also according to a video game addiction survey, players can’t stop it even though they know that it is interfere their life.

Oggins, J., & Sammis, J. (2012). Notions of video game addiction and their relation to self-reported addiction among players of world of warcraft. International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction10(2), 210-230.

  1. Reference :

Alderman, N. (2009). How videogames took over the world. The Guardian. Retrieved from http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2009/dec/11/naomi-alderman-computer-games.

 

Using Penrose’s database :

Virtually Real

Title : Exploring Avatar Identification in Game Addiction Among Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Games (MMORPG) Players

Autor : Sukkyung YouEuikyung KimDonguk Lee

Volume: 12 issue: 1, page(s): 56-71

Article first published online: April 23, 2015;Issue published: January 1, 2017

 

Summarization: the research in the article demonstrates the relationship of various psychosocial variables such as self-esteem, depression, social skills to online game addiction. According to the research, online game addiction negatively affect to mental health.

 

  1. Kevin Wong(2014) insists that WOW is very addictive through showing some examples in his article “The Worst Examples of World of Warcraft Addiction”. Oggins and Sammis also refer that the seriousness of addiction of WOW with a result of survey which shows that the players can not stop to play the game even though they know some adverse effects of that. The authors quote the article “How videogames took over the world” written by Alderman to support their opinion. Lastly, the article “Exploring Avatar Identification in Game Addiction Among Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Games (MMORPG) Players” written by Sukkyung YouEuikyung KimDonguk Lee demonstrates that addiction of online game has negative effects for various psychosocial variables such as self-esteem, depression, social skills.

 

Reference

 

Oggins, J., & Sammis, J. (2012). Notions of video game addiction and their relation to self-reported addiction among players of world of warcraft. International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction10(2), 210-230.

 

Alderman, N. (2009). How videogames took over the world. The Guardian. Retrieved from http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2009/dec/11/naomi-alderman-computer-games.

 

Wong, K. (2014). “The Worst Examples of World of Warcraft Addiction”. Retrieved from http://www.complex.com/pop-culture/2014/11/the-worst-examples-of-world-of-warcraft-addiction/.

 

You, S., Kim, E., & Lee, D. (2017). Virtually real: exploring avatar identification in game addiction among massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPG) players. Games and Culture12(1), 56-71.

 

WoW Addiction

When analyzing the conversation between actively playing World of Warcraft and addictive qualities, it is crucial to define how a player’s gaming activity can affect their lives.  While it is as easy as pressing one button to log out of the game, to disassociate oneself from a World of Warcraft (WoW) gaming session can be much harder.  With prolonged exposure to the game’s activities, and community, players are often swept up into the fantasy lives that are provided through the online service.  Because of this unique paradigm between the player and game an addictive quality is present.  In Online gaming addiction? Motives predict addictive play behavior in massively multiplayer online role-playing games, a study into the the addictive qualities of MMORPG’s the causes for addiction are brought to light.  The study discusses the allure of living a life separate from an individuals’ real life.  Being able to live a life of adventure, fantasy, having options to create an idealistic façade, and having numerical power over others such as levels, and powers, an attachment to the game can be fostered (Kuss 1).

Kevin Wong a freelance writer for COMPLEX writes, “An Idaho mom lost custody of her kids by playing WoW for up to eight hours a day, at times neglecting to feed them” (Wong 1). As present in Wong’s findings, those who perpetuate an intimate relationship with the game spend a significant amount of time focused on playing rather than addressing real world problems daily activities and relationships with others. Matilda Karjalainem, and Maija Majamäki substantiate this claim through their study, ‘Present yet absent’: Negotiating commitment and intimacy in life with an excessive online role gamerThe authors write, “the study demonstrates the timeliness in devoting attention to the premises under which intimacy and commitment are negotiated in offline and online relationship constellations” (Karjalainen, 1).  Their findings suggest that the relationships of individuals who become invested in WoW exhibit traits that are conducive to ending relationships conceived prior to the player’s involvement in the game.  The conversation associated with WoW addiction revolves around the findings that as players begin to invest their time into the game, real world responsibilities and relationships are hindered due to a lack of attention on the part of the gamer.

However, not all players of MMORPG’s and WoW who invest a substantial amount of their time are addicted.  Much like an athlete spends countless hours on their respective sport, time engaged in the game does not correlate to addiction.  It is problematic usage, and abuse of the game that produces the situations discussed above.  Christopher S. Peters, and Alvin L. Malesky write, “personality characteristics of agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism, and extraversion,” all play into the accumulation of negative side effects of gaming (Peters 1).  WoW, although addictive in nature can seduce players into an investment of both money and time, the addiction that is placed on the individual is negative when paired with excessive use, and other risk factors. It is through the gaming activity that many problems can arise and with the predisposed features and accessibility of the game WoW is addictive.

Works Cited

Hellman, Matilda, Salla-Maria Karjalainen, and Maija Majamäki. “‘Present yet absent’:

Negotiating commitment and intimacy in life with an excessive online role gamer.” new media & society (2016): 1461444816636091.

Kuss, Daria J., Jorik Louws, and Reinout W. Wiers. “Online gaming addiction? Motives    predict addictive play behavior in massively multiplayer online role-playing      games.” Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking 15.9 (2012): 480-485.

Peters, Christopher S., and L. Alvin Malesky Jr. “Problematic usage among highly-engaged players of massively multiplayer online role playing games.” CyberPsychology & Behavior 11.4 (2008): 481-484.

Wong, Kevin. “The Worst Examples of ‘World of Warcraft’ Addiction.” COMPLEX, 13 Nov. 2014, www.complex.com/pop-culture/2014/11/the-worst-examples-of-world-of-warcraft-addiction/. Accessed 29 Mar. 2017.

 

 

Is World of Warcraft Addicting?

There were many stories of people who had become very addicted to WoW, and had suffered consequences are a result. This includes former video game addict Ryan van Cleave, whom I read about in an article named “At war with World of Warcraft: an addict tells his story. This article I found on “The Guardian”. He played WoW so much it consumed his life and made him put on weight.

https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2011/aug/29/world-of-warcraft-video-game-addict

This was written by Tamara Lush.

On Google Scholar I found an article that speaks about problems excessive World of Warcraft players may have with decision making under risky conditions. This is from the “Psychiatry Research Volume 188, Issue 3”. The article goes on to explain that excessive internet gaming can be considered as a non-financial form of pathological gambling. During a study, participants who played WoW tended to select risky alternatives which potentially result in immediate reward, but are disadvantageous in the long run. This happened significantly more than the other group who had not had played WoW.

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165178111003830

This was written by Mirko Pawlikowski and Matthias Brand.

This journal I found from the references in my previous article I spoke about is called “Neural substrates of decision making in adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder”. This was written in “The American Journal of Psychiatry”. The piece speaks upon the propensity for individuals with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder to develop more addictive habits towards activities, specifically video games.

http://search.proquest.com/docview/220480362?accountid=14608&rfr_id=info%3Axri%2Fsid%3Aprimo

Written by Ernst, Monique ; Kimes, Alane ; London, Edythe ; Matochik, John.

I believe that the articles informed me that World of Warcraft is an addictive game and can have negative impacts through that addiction. The first article I had read talked about how a man was so addicted to the game that he became less close with his family, and allowed himself to be unhealthy. This shows that the game’s addictive qualities can have detrimental impacts on your body and mind. The second article taught me that individuals under a stressful, risky situation may be more likely to choose the incorrect option to proceed. This could put someone’s life in danger as the game causes people to think differently. The third article I read informed me about how people with attention deficit disorder are more likely to become addicted to video games because they have an addictive trend. This will cause people who suffer from this disorder to do less of what they should be doing and stay in and play video games all day.

Works Cited

Tamara Lush, Associated Press, in Sarasota, Florida. (2011, August 29). At war with World of Warcraft: an addict tells his story. Retrieved March 29, 2017, from https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2011/aug/29/world-of-warcraft-video-game-addict

Pawlikowski, M., & Brand, M. (15 august 2011). Excessive Internet gaming and decision making: Do excessive World of Warcraft players have problems in decision making under risky conditions? Psychiatry Research,188(3), 428-433. Retrieved March 29, 2017, from http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165178111003830

Ernst, M., Kimes, A. S., & London, E. D. (june 2003). Neural substrates of decision making in adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. American Journal of Psychiatry. Retrieved March 29, 2017, from

 

http://search.proquest.com/docview/220480362?accountid=14608&rfr_id=info%3Axri%2Fsid%3Aprimo

WoW I’m addicted

Although World or Warcraft is a game made for the community to enjoy and connect with another it can become an addiction. After a study of whether or not children are becoming addicted to video games, the data states that globally around 4% to 10% of children playing videogames are addicted. (Bresnahan) Will Worley uses the definition of addiction as when something starts to hurt your life. (Bresnahan) This means that video game addiction is where your life as a whole is being affected in a negative way like spending less time with family and friends. Wolf stated, “In this context it has to be noted that MMORPG form a special subset of online games which demand a much stronger commitment than other online genres.” (Wolf) This means that if you want to be the best of the best in WoW you will have to be committing tons of time to stay ahead of everyone else. There are however benefits to MMORPG’s. In Minkyung and Jisuk’s experiement they found that children that used technology in a communitive way allowed them to learn to read and write better. (Sung) This is also supported by Buckman’s data, where the kids were in a similar experiment.(Bruckman)

 

Bresnahan, Samantha and Worley Will. “When video games become an addiction.” CNN (2016).

 

Wolf, Karsten D. “Communities of Practice in MMORPGs: an entry point into addiction?.” Communities and technologies 2007. Springer London, 2007. 191-208.

 

Sung, Minkyung, and Jisuk Kim. “Effects of Usefulness, Enjoyment, Sense of Community on Knowledge Management in Community of Practice (CoP) among University Students.” International Information Institute (Tokyo). Information 17.7 (2014): 3123.

 

Bruckman, Amy. “Community support for constructionist learning.” Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW) 7.1 (1998): 47-86.

Is World of Warcraft Addicting?

World of Warcraft is an addicting game when looking at addiction as something that is debilitating to a person’s quality of life. In the article “Woman loses children to ‘World of Warcraft’ addiction,” a woman in Idaho loses custody of her children because she neglected them to play World of Warcraft (Kauder 1). This is an example of a World of Warcraft addiction causing this woman to have a poor quality of life because she barely takes care of herself, let alone her children. In the article “Addiction and Engagement: An Explorative Study Toward Classification Criteria for Internet Gaming Disorder,” World of Warcraft players in Germany were sampled and the researchers found that the addiction to the game was connected to mental illnesses such as depression and social anxiety (Lehenbauer, et al. 1). This shows gaming addiction is debilitating because people who are addicted to online games such as World of Warcraft are having issues with coping with life. In the third source “ Problematic Internet use and psychosocial well-being among MMO players,” results were found pointing to MMO gaming variables contribute to problematic internet use (Caplan et al. 1). This proves that gaming addiction is debilitating to people’s lives because their internet usage is interfering with their personal relationships and other aspects of their lives. All of these examples show that World of Warcraft is an addictive game.

Works Cited

Caplan, Scott, et al. “Problematic Internet Use and Psychosocial Well-Being among MMO Players.” Computers in Human Behavior, vol. 25, no. 6, Nov. 2009. Academic Search Complete [EBSCO] doi:10.1016/j.chb.2009.06.006. Accessed 29 Mar. 2017.

Kauder, Rob. “Woman Loses Children to ‘World of Warcraft’ Addiction.” KXLY, KXLY.com, 21 Nov. 2016, www.kxly.com/news/local-news/north-idaho/woman-loses-children-to-world-of-warcraft-addiction/176960245. Accessed 29 Mar. 2017.

Lehenbauer-Baum, Mario, et al. “Addiction and Engagement: An Explorative Study Toward Classification Criteria for Internet Gaming Disorder.” Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, vol. 18, no. 6, 1 June 2015. Academic Search Complete [EBSCO], doi:10.1089/cyber.2015.0063. Accessed 29 Mar. 2017.

Is WoW Addicting?

 

Not only World of Warcraft, but all video games have been and are becoming increasingly more addicting. Video game culture is emerging as the community expands and the capabilities of technology develop. With World of Warcraft, Blizzard has been able to expand on the features of past MMORPGs and the habits of gamers to create better features which have caused players spend more time playing rather than doing other social activities (Oggins). For example, Blizzard has created a feature allowing players that have previously erased their accounts to rejoin the game right back where they were. Even if a gamer escapes the “black hole”, there are now features to suck them back in (Sottek). There are also more reasons for players to stay in the game today. A growing comfort within video game culture has made gamers discuss and grow as a community. The larger community keeps people involved (Alderman). Automated bots also show trends in player preferences being expanding and allowing more features that keep people involved (Ducheneaut). A combination of new developments by Blizzard and video games overall has made it much easier for players to become addicted.

References

Alderman, N. (2009, December 10). How videogames took over the world. Retrieved March 29, 2017, from https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2009/dec/11/naomi-alderman-computer-games

Ducheneaut, N., Yee, N., Nickell, E., & Moore, R. J. (2006). Building an MMO With Mass Appeal. Games and Culture, 1(4), 281-317. doi:10.1177/1555412006292613

Oggins, J., & Sammis, J. (2010). Notions of Video Game Addiction and Their Relation to Self-Reported Addiction Among Players of World of Warcraft. International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction, 10(2), 210-230. doi:10.1007/s11469-010-9309-y

Sottek, T. (2014, September 26). If ‘World of Warcraft’ is a drug, Blizzard is a cruel drug dealer. Retrieved March 29, 2017, from http://www.theverge.com/2014/9/26/6849317/if-world-of-warcraft-is-a-drug-blizzard-is-a-cruel-drug-dealer

World of Warcraft is about to ruin my life?

As almost any substance or activity in life, the game World of Warcraft can also be found as a very addictive use of time. Although many people treat the addictiveness video games almost as a joke or a simple lack of self-control, it is actually a very serious issue in our modern society. Jean Oggins and Jeffrey Sammis found that this addiction stems, mostly, from the salience of the video game in one’s life – this is to say that the addiction stems from the importance of the game to that person (Jean Oggins and Jeffrey Sammis, 2010). Furthermore, this addiction is joke; Doctors Grüsser, Thalemann, and Griffiths have found that almost 12% of those that play videogames have the basis to be considered addicted to a game that they play (Dr. S.M. Grüsser, R. Thalemann, M.D. Griffiths, 2007). Overall, this addiction to World of Warcraft is most definitely a real issue and it needs to be resolved, because like Ashley Van Simper said, countless victims are losing control of their lives all of the time (Ashley Van Simper, 2013).

 

Works Cited

Simper, A. V. (2013, July 28). Internet addict tells how World of Warcraft gaming had become ‘like crack cocaine’ after five week binge surrounded by filth. Retrieved March 29, 2017, from Internet addict tells how World of Warcraft gaming had become ‘like crack cocaine’ after five week binge surrounded by filth

 

Oggins, J., & Sammis, J. (2010, December 29). Notions of Video Game Addiction and Their Relation to Self-Reported Addiction Among Players of World of Warcraft. Retrieved March 29, 2017, from https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11469-010-9309-y#Abs1

 

Grüsser, S. M., Thalemann, R., & Griffiths, M. D. (2007, May 2). Excessive Computer Game Playing: Evidence for Addiction and Aggression? Retrieved March 29, 2017, from http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/abs/10.1089/cpb.2006.9956

 

 

 

Is WoW Addicting???

Is WOW Addicting?

The nonacademic article I read was titled “At War with World of Warcraft: An Addict Tells His Story”. The article took us through Ryan Cleaves life of Warcraft. Ryan, a married father and English teacher, was consumed in the game for many years, causing domestic and personal issues. He even considered taking his own life, as he couldn’t escape. Written by Tamara Lush and published on The Guardian

The academic article I came across was titled “Excessive Internet Gaming and Decision Making: Do excessive World of Warcraft players have problems in decision making under risky conditions?” It was written by Matthias Brand and published on Science Direct. It gave accounts of studies of Warcraft gamers reacting to a high-pressure scenario, and compared to the control group, the gamers showed qualities of other addicts.

The resource article I liked was titled “Distinguishing addiction and high engagement in the context of online game playing”. It was written by John P Charlton and published on Science Direct. It gave me a new perspective on the issue, saying those who play a lot of video games aren’t your common addicts. Sure, they suffer from relapse and willingness to play, however it doesn’t go as deep into the brain as a drug users addiction would.

I believe WOW is a new wave of addiction. Although the last article said otherwise, reading the vivid account of Ryan Cleave, and seeing the results published by Matthias Brand, I speculate WOW and online gaming in general seems to be the most accessible, safe, and addicting form of stimulation in our world. Virtual reality is a scary foreshadow of our future, and I believe WOW was just the beginning.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Work Cited

Charlton, John P. “Distinguishing Addiction and High Engagement in the Context of Online Game Playing.” N.p., n.d. Web. 29 Mar. 2017.

Pawlikowski, Mirko, and Matthias Brand. “Excessive Internet gaming and decision making: do excessive World of Warcraft players have problems in decision making under risky conditions?.” Psychiatry research 188.3 (2011): 428-433.

Lush, Tamara. “At War with World of Warcraft: An Addict Tells His Story.” The Guardian. Guardian News and Media, 29 Aug. 2011. Web. 29 Mar. 2017.

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